Lincoln Boyhood Home

Lincoln Boyhood Home could refer to

  • Knob Creek Farm - where Abraham Lincoln lived from 1811-1816 in Larue County, Kentucky
  • Lincoln Boyhood National Memorial - where Abraham Lincoln lived from 1816-1830 in Spencer County, Indiana

Other articles related to "boyhood":

Thymos: Journal Of Boyhood Studies
... Thymos Journal of Boyhood Studies is a peer-reviewed academic journal established in 2007 as the fourth of four published by Men's Studies Press and the first worldwide to focus specifically on boys ... forum for the critical discussion of boyhood and the dissemination of current research and reflections on boys’ lives to a broad, cross-disciplinary ... son-father relations and the effect on boys of the missing father, boyhood subcultures and sexualities, physical and emotional abuse of boys, portrayal of boys in the media, boys in sports, and the folklore ...
Boyhood (disambiguation)
... Boyhood is the state or period of being a boy ... Boyhood can also refer to Boyhood (novel), an 1854 novel by Leo Tolstoy Boyhood (film), an upcoming film by Richard Linklater Boyhood Scenes from ...

Famous quotes containing the words home, lincoln and/or boyhood:

    A man would prefer to come home to an unmade bed and a happy woman than to a neatly made bed and an angry woman.
    Marlene Dietrich (1904–1992)

    In using the strong hand, as now compelled to do, the government has a difficult duty to perform. At the very best, it will by turns do both too little and too much. It can properly have no motive of revenge, no purpose to punish merely for punishment’s sake. While we must, by all available means, prevent the overthrow of the government, we should avoid planting and cultivating too many thorns in the bosom of society.
    —Abraham Lincoln (1809–1865)

    I looked at my daughters, and my boyhood picture, and appreciated the gift of parenthood, at that moment, more than any other gift I have ever been given. For what person, except one’s own children, would want so deeply and sincerely to have shared your childhood? Who else would think your insignificant and petty life so precious in the living, so rich in its expressiveness, that it would be worth partaking of what you were, to understand what you are?
    Gerald Early (20th century)