Letters Written in Sweden

Some articles on written, letters written in sweden:

Torah
... Torah Shebichtav (תורה שבכתב, "Torah that is written"), and an Oral Torah, Torah Shebe'al Peh (תורה שבעל פה, "Torah that is spoken") ... The words of the Torah are written on a scroll by a sofer on parchment in Hebrew ... to religious tradition, all of the laws found in the Torah, both written and oral, were given by God to Moses, some of them at Mount Sinai and others at the Tabernacle, and all the teachings were ...
Endianness - History
... However, numbers are written almost universally in the Hindu-Arabic numeral system, in which the most significant digits are written first in languages written left-to-right, and last in languages written right-to-left ...
Ramsey Campbell - Bibliography - Novels
... text, 1985) The Bride of Frankenstein (1977) (novelisation of the 1935 film, written as Carl Dreadstone) Dracula's Daughter (1977) (novelisation of the 1936 film, written as Carl Dreadstone ...
Letters Written In Sweden, Norway, And Denmark - Reception and Legacy - Romanticism
... The Romantic poets were more profoundly affected by Letters Written in Sweden, Norway, and Denmark than anyone, except perhaps Godwin ...
Second Epistle To The Thessalonians
... Thessalonians, often referred to as Second Thessalonians and written 2 Thessalonians, is a book from the New Testament of the Christian Bible ... The dating of the book is believed by many scholars to be written between 52-54 AD, shortly after the First Epistle to the Thessalonians was written ...

Famous quotes containing the words letters and/or written:

    It is hard to believe that England is so near as from your letters it appears; and that this identical piece of paper has lately come all the way from there hither, begrimed with the English dust which made you hesitate to use it; from England, which is only historical fairyland to me, to America, which I have put my spade into, and about which there is no doubt.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    The prostitute is the scapegoat for everyone’s sins, and few people care whether she is justly treated or not. Good people have spent thousands of pounds in efforts to reform her, poets have written about her, essayists and orators have made her the subject of some of their most striking rhetoric; perhaps no class of people has been so much abused, and alternatively sentimentalized over as prostitutes have been but one thing they have never yet had, and that is simple legal justice.
    —Alison Neilans. “Justice for the Prostitute—Lady Astor’s Bill,” Equal Rights (September 19, 1925)