Letters To The Inhabitants of Canada

The Letters to the inhabitants of Canada were three letters written by the First and Second Continental Congresses in 1774, 1775, and 1776 to communicate directly with the population of the Province of Quebec, formerly the French province of Canada, which had no representative system at the time. Their purpose was to draw the large French-speaking population to the American revolutionary cause. This goal ultimately failed, and Quebec, along with the other northern provinces of British America, remained in British hands. The only significant assistance that was gained was the recruitment of two regiments totalling not more than 1,000 men.

Read more about Letters To The Inhabitants Of Canada:  Background, Third Letter, Conclusion, Contents of The Letters

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Letters To The Inhabitants Of Canada - Contents of The Letters
... and French Wikisource have the contents of the letters Letter to the Inhabitants of the Province of Quebec, October 26, 1774 (en, fr) Letter to the oppressed inhabitants of Canada, May 29 ...

Famous quotes containing the words canada, letters and/or inhabitants:

    In Canada an ordinary New England house would be mistaken for the ch√Ęteau, and while every village here contains at least several gentlemen or “squires,” there is but one to a seigniory.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    ... all my letters are read. I like that. I usually put something in there that I would like the staff to see. If some of the staff are lazy and choose not to read the mail, I usually write on the envelope “Legal Mail.” This way it will surely be read. It’s important that we educate everybody as we go along.
    Jean Gump, U.S. pacifist. As quoted in The Great Divide, book 2, section 10, by Studs Terkel (1988)

    Perhaps anxious politicians may prove that only seventeen white men and five negroes were concerned in the late enterprise; but their very anxiety to prove this might suggest to themselves that all is not told. Why do they still dodge the truth? They are so anxious because of a dim consciousness of the fact, which they do not distinctly face, that at least a million of the free inhabitants of the United States would have rejoiced if it had succeeded. They at most only criticise the tactics.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)