Letters To The Inhabitants of Canada

The Letters to the inhabitants of Canada were three letters written by the First and Second Continental Congresses in 1774, 1775, and 1776 to communicate directly with the population of the Province of Quebec, formerly the French province of Canada, which had no representative system at the time. Their purpose was to draw the large French-speaking population to the American revolutionary cause. This goal ultimately failed, and Quebec, along with the other northern provinces of British America, remained in British hands. The only significant assistance that was gained was the recruitment of two regiments totalling not more than 1,000 men.

Read more about Letters To The Inhabitants Of Canada:  Background, Third Letter, Conclusion, Contents of The Letters

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Letters To The Inhabitants Of Canada - Contents of The Letters
... English and French Wikisource have the contents of the letters Letter to the Inhabitants of the Province of Quebec, October 26, 1774 (en, fr) Letter to the oppressed inhabitants of ...

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