Letters of The Living

The Letters of the Living (Arabic: حروف الحي‎) was a title provided by the Báb to the first eighteen disciples of the Bábí Religion. In some understandings the Báb places himself at the head of this list (as the first letter). In this article, the former notation will be used except when specifically said otherwise.

Read more about Letters Of The Living:  Mystical Meaning, The Letters, Polemical Claims About The Letters, Mírzá Yaḥyá Amongst The Letters

Other articles related to "letters of the living, letters":

Báb - Life - Letters of The Living
... gives the metaphorical identity of the Letters of the Living as the Fourteen Infallibles in Shí'í Islam (Muhammad, the Twelve Imams, and Fatimah) and the four archangels ...
Letters Of The Living - Mírzá Yaḥyá Amongst The Letters
... It has been stated that Mírzá Yaḥyá was the fourth of the Letters of the Living (where the Báb would be the first) by E.G ... The book does not include any other details of the Letters and is against the Bahá'ís' commonly accepted view that Mulla Ḥusayn's brother and nephew recognised the Báb shortly after him (since they'd take the ... The assertion that either were Letters is contrary to Bahá'í accounts ...

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