Letters of Jonathan Oldstyle

Letters Of Jonathan Oldstyle

The Letters of Jonathan Oldstyle, Gent. (1802) is a collection of nine observational letters written by American writer Washington Irving under the pseudonym Jonathan Oldstyle. The letters first appeared in the November 15, 1802, edition of the New York Morning Chronicle, a political-leaning newspaper partially owned by New Yorker Aaron Burr, and edited by Irving's brother, Peter. The letters were printed at irregular intervals until April 23, 1803. The letters lampoon marriage, manners, dress, and culture of early 19th century New York. They are Irving's debut in print.

Read more about Letters Of Jonathan OldstylePublic Reaction, Publishing History, Literary Tradition

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Letters Of Jonathan Oldstyle - Literary Tradition
... Observational letters, like Irving's Oldstyle letters, are a tradition that date in America as far back as the 1720s, when Benjamin Franklin wrote similar letters to the New-England ...

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