Lawshall - Facilities - Recreation Ground and Open Spaces

Recreation Ground and Open Spaces

There is a recreation ground on the Shimping Road (near Newhouse Farmhouse) which is used by Hartest and Coldham Hall Cricket Club and Lawshall Swan Football Club. For many years it was also the home ground of Coldham Hall Football Club for whom Brian Talbot played for as a youngster. Previous locations in the parish where sports were played included the field near the entrance to Coldham Hall and the field at the rear of All Saints Church.

Open spaces within the parish include:

  • Land between The Glebe and Shepherds Drive - including the play area managed by the Lawshall Community Playground Society.
  • Land behind Churchill Close - grassed area used for informal football games.
  • Grassland at Hanningfield Green - meadow grassland area that is now designated as a County Wildlife Site.
  • Grassland at Lawshall Green - a remaining fragment of flower-rich grassland.

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