Lawrence Weathers

Lawrence Carthage Weathers VC (14 May 1890 – 29 September 1918) was a New Zealand born, Australian serviceman recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces.


Born in Te Kopuru, New Zealand, his family moved to Australia when he was seven years old and settled in rural South Australia. Weathers was educated at Snowtown Public School.

He was 28 years old, and a Temporary Corporal in the 43rd Battalion, (S.A.), Australian Imperial Force during the First World War when as part of a group equipped with Mills bomb the following deed took place for which he was awarded the VC:

No. 1153 L./Cpl. (T./Cpl.) Lawrence Carthage Weathers, 43rd Bn., A.I.F.

For most conspicuous bravery and devotion to duty on the 2nd September, 1918 north of Peronne, when with an advanced bombing party.

The attack having been held up by a strongly held enemy trench, Cpl. Weathers went forward alone under heavy fire and attacked the enemy with bombs. Then, returning to our lines for a further supply of bombs, he again went forward with three comrades, and attacked under very heavy fire. Regardless of personal danger, he mounted the enemy parapet and bombed the trench, and, with the support of his comrades, captured 180 prisoners and three machine guns.

His valour and determination resulted in the successful capture of the final objective, and saved the lives of many of his comrades.

He was killed in action, north-east of Peronne, France, on 29 September 1918, and is buried at the Unicorn Commonwealth War Graves Commission Cemetery, Vendhuile. His elder brother had previously been killed during the Gallipoli Campaign.

Because he was born in New Zealand, Weathers is sometimes listed as a New Zealand recipient of the VC.

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