Ladies of Llangollen - Early Lives

Early Lives

Eleanor Charlotte Butler (11 May 1739–2 June 1829) was a member of one of the dynastic families of Ireland, the Butlers, the Earls (and later Dukes) of Ormond, who number amongst their ancestors Queen Anne Boleyn (through her paternal grandmother Lady Margaret Butler). Eleanor was considered an over-educated bookworm by her family, who resided at the Butler family seat Kilkenny Castle. She spoke French and was educated in a convent in France. Her mother tried to make her join a convent because she was becoming a spinster.

Sarah Ponsonby (1755–9 December 1831) lived with relatives in Woodstock, Ireland. She was a second cousin of Frederick Ponsonby, 3rd Earl of Bessborough, and thus a second cousin, once-removed, of his daughter the Lady Caroline Lamb.

Their families lived only two miles (3 km) from each other. They met in 1768, and quickly became friends. Over the years they formulated a plan for a private rural retreat.

Read more about this topic:  Ladies Of Llangollen

Other articles related to "early lives":

Horten Brothers - Biography - Early Lives
... This back-to-the-basics education, and an admiration of German avant-aircraft designer Alexander Lippisch, led the Hortens away from the dominant design trends of the 1920s and '30s, and toward experimenting with alternative airframes—building models and then filling their parents' house with full-sized wooden sailplanes ... The first Horten glider flew in 1933, by which time both brothers were members of the Hitler Youth ...
The Three Doctors (motivational Speakers) - Early Lives
... Rameck Hunt grew up in a childhood where the only person he could depend on was his grandma ... He had many ups and downs in his life, like dealing with his mom being a drug addict, hanging with the wrong crowd who got him into trouble, and thinking the way to succeed in life is by selling drugs and stealing ...

Famous quotes containing the words lives and/or early:

    It is not women’s fault if we are so tender. It is in the nature of the lives we live. And further, it would be a terrible catastrophe if men had to live men’s lives and women’s also. Which is precisely what has happened today—to women.
    Selma James (b. 1930)

    To be candid, in Middlemarch phraseology, meant, to use an early opportunity of letting your friends know that you did not take a cheerful view of their capacity, their conduct, or their position; and a robust candour never waited to be asked for its opinion.
    George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian)