Killed Science Fiction

Some articles on science, science fiction, killed science fiction:

Vannevar Bush Award
... The National Science Board established the Vannevar Bush Award (/væˈniːvər/ van-NEE-vər) in 1980 to honor Dr ... who, through public service activities in science and technology, has made an outstanding "contribution toward the welfare of mankind and the Nation." The recipient of the award ... force behind the establishment of the National Science Foundation ...
J. Robert Oppenheimer - Final Years
... what would eventually become the World Academy of Art and Science in 1960. 1955, nor, though invited, did he attend the first Pugwash Conferences on Science and World Affairs in 1957 ... the power of knowledge in a world in which the freedom of science to exchange ideas was more and more hobbled by political concerns ...
Vannevar Bush
28, 1974) was an American engineer, inventor and science administrator known for his work on analog computers, for his role as an initiator and administrator of the Manhattan Project, for founding Raytheon, and for ... the activities of some six thousand leading American scientists in the application of science to warfare ... public intellectual during World War II, when he was in effect the first presidential science advisor ...
Earl Kemp - Science Fiction Editor and Fan
... In 1952, Kemp attended his first World Science Fiction Convention ... my kind of people." In 1956 Kemp and other members of the University of Chicago Science Fiction Club founded AdventPublishers, which publishes science fiction ... Hugo Award for Best Fanzine in 1961 for his publication Who Killed Science Fiction ...
Science and Society - Political Usage
... See also Politicization of science Many issues damage the relationship of science to the media and the use of science and scientific arguments by ... it their only goal to cast doubt on supported science because it conflicts with political agendas ...

Famous quotes containing the words fiction, killed and/or science:

    My mother ... believed fiction gave one an unrealistic view of the world. Once she caught me reading a novel and chastised me: “Never let me catch you doing that again, remember what happened to Emma Bovary.”
    Angela Carter (1940–1992)

    My movie is born first in my head, dies on paper; is resuscitated by the living persons and real objects I use, which are killed on film but, placed in a certain order and projected on to a screen, come to life again like flowers in water.
    Robert Bresson (b. 1907)

    Science without religion is lame, religion without science is blind.
    Albert Einstein (1879–1955)