Kevin Reed - Reed's Writings and Interactions With His Work

Reed's Writings and Interactions With His Work

  • Reed: "Imperious Presbyterianism"
  • Reed: "Church Membership in an Age of Idolatry and Confusion"
  • Reed on Celebrating Christmas
  • Reed: Making Shipwreck of the Faith — Evangelicals and Roman Catholics Together
  • Reed: Biblical Worship
  • Book Review by Reed, Presbyterian Worship: Old and New — A Review and Commentary upon Worship in Spirit and Truth, a book by John Frame (Phillipsburg, N.J.: Presbyterian and Reformed Pub. Co., 1996; paper, 171 pages)
  • An Essay by Reed on Presbyterian Worship — An Extended Review and Commentary Based upon the Geneva Papers by James Jordan
  • Reed on the Decline of American Presbyterianism
  • Reed: Presbyterian Government in Extraordinary Times
  • Reed: Biblical Church Government
  • Reed: True and False Worship
  • Interaction with Reed's Monograph Presbyterian Government in Extraordinary Times
  • Appendix G in The Covenanted Reformation Defended by Greg Barrow: A brief examination of Mr. Bacon's principles regarding the visible church and the use of private judgment. Also, some observations regarding his ignoble attack upon Kevin Reed in his book entitled The Visible Church in the Outer Darkness
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Name Reed, Kevin
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Date of birth May 9, 1955
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