Kasaya (clothing) - Kesa in Japanese Buddhism

Kesa in Japanese Buddhism

In Japanese Buddhism, the kāṣāya is called kesa (Jp. 袈裟). In Japan, during the Edo and Meiji periods, kesa were even sometimes pieced together from robes used in Noh theatre.

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