Julian Year

A Julian year can refer to:

  • The Julian year (astronomy) is a time interval of exactly 365.25 Earth days, used in astronomy.
  • The Julian year (calendar) is a year in the Julian calendar which has started on different days, at different times, in different countries and is equal to either 365 or 366 days, or 365.25 days on average.

Other articles related to "julian year, year, julian, years":

Julian Year (astronomy) - Usage
... The Julian year is not a fundamental unit of measurement in the International System of Units (SI), but it is recognized by the International Astronomical Union (IAU) as a non-SI unit for use in ... Before 1984, both the Julian year and the mean tropical year were used by astronomers ... Simon Newcomb used both in his Tables of the Sun in the form of the Julian century (36,525 days) and the "solar century" (36,524.22 days), a rounded form of 100 mean tropical years of 365.242 ...
Julian Year (astronomy)
... In astronomy, a Julian year (symbol a) is a unit of measurement of time defined as exactly 365.25 days of 86,400 SI seconds each ... The Julian year is the average length of the year in the Julian calendar used in Western societies in previous centuries, and for which the unit is named ... Nevertheless, because an astronomical Julian year measures duration rather than designating a date, this Julian year does not correspond to years in the Julian calendar or any other calendar ...

Famous quotes containing the words year and/or julian:

    Even an attorney of moderate talent can postpone doomsday year after year, for the system of appeals that pervades American jurisprudence amounts to a legalistic wheel of fortune, a game of chance, somewhat fixed in the favor of the criminal, that the participants play interminably.
    Truman Capote (1924–1984)

    The rich were dull and they drank too much or they played too much backgammon. They were dull and they were repetitious. He remembered poor Julian and his romantic awe of them and how he had started a story once that began, “The very rich are different from you and me.” And how someone had said to Julian, “Yes, they have more money.”
    Ernest Hemingway (1899–1961)