Journal of African American History

The Journal of African American History, formerly The Journal of Negro History (1916–2001), is an academic journal covering African American life and history. It was founded in 1916 by Carter G. Woodson. The journal is published four times a year by the Association for the Study of African American Life and History, founded in 1915 by Woodson and Jesse E. Moorland.

Famous quotes containing the words history, american, african and/or journal:

    The myth of independence from the mother is abandoned in mid- life as women learn new routes around the mother—both the mother without and the mother within. A mid-life daughter may reengage with a mother or put new controls on care and set limits to love. But whatever she does, her child’s history is never finished.
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