Jonathan Downes - Books

Books

He has written the following books:

  • Take this Brother may it serve you well (1988)
  • Riding the Waves (with Kim Andrews) (1990)
  • El Grand Senor (with Kim Andrews) (1991)
  • Road Dreams (1993)
  • Smaller Mystery Carnivores of the Westcountry (1996)
  • The Owlman and Others (ISBN 1-905723-02-4, 1997)
  • The Rising of the Moon with Nigel Wright (ISBN 0-9544936-5-6, 1999)
  • Weird Devon with Richard Freeman and Graham Inglis (ISBN 1-899383-38-7, 2000)
  • UFOs over Devon (ISBN 1-899383-37-9, 2000)
  • Weird War Tales with Nick Redfern (2000)
  • Weird War Tales Volume 2 with Nick Redfern (2000)
  • The Blackdown Mystery (ISBN 1-905723-00-8, 2000)
  • Only Fools and Goatsuckers (ISBN 0-9512872-3-0, 2001)
  • In the Beginning - Animals & Men Collected Editions Volume One (Ed)(2001)
  • The Number of the Beast - Animals & Men Collected Editions Volume Two(Ed) (2001)
  • The Monster of the Mere (ISBN 0-9512872-2-2, 2002)
  • Monster Hunter (ISBN 0-9512872-7-3, 2004)
  • Strength through Koi (ISBN 1-905723-04-0, 2006)
  • The Call of the Wild - Animals & Men Collected Editions Volume Three (ISBN 978-1905723072, 2007)
  • The Island of Paradise: Chupacabra, UFO Crash Retrievals, and Accelerated Evolution on the Island of Puerto Rico (ISBN 978-1905723324) 2008)

His best selling book is The Owlman and Others. In his 2004 autobiography Monster Hunter, he discusses his years of substance abuse, as well as his achievements as a cryptozoologist. Once described by Nick Redfern as "Cryptozoology's answer to Hunter Thompson", Downes has stated on a number of occasions that this aspect of his life is now firmly in the past. His latest book is a re-examination of the Puerto Rican chupacabras mythos, based on two expeditions to the island in 1998 and 2004. In addition he has edited ten annual Yearbooks for the CFZ.

His new book `Island of Paradise` covers in great depth his two expeditions to Puerto Rico in search of the chupacabra and other animals of fortean interest.

Also Nick Redfern's 2004 book Three Men Seeking Monsters: Six Weeks in Pursuit of Werewolves, Lake Monsters, Giant Cats, Ghostly Devil Dogs and Ape-men is a fictionalized chronicle of the adventures of Redfern, Downes and Richard Freeman.

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