John Florio

John Florio (1553–1625), known in Italian as Giovanni Florio, was a linguist and lexicographer, a royal language tutor at the Court of James I, and a possible friend and influence on William Shakespeare. He was also the translator of Montaigne into English.

Read more about John FlorioMichelangelo Florio, Exile of The Family, Work in England, Shakespeare Authorship Theory

Other articles related to "john florio, florio":

John Florio - Shakespeare Authorship Theory
... Florio is one of many individuals who has been identified as the real author of the works of William Shakespeare by advocates of the Shakespeare authorship ... However, according to Canadian-Italian writer Lamberto Tassinari, Florio's own vitality, wit, education, learning, facility with a wide vocabulary and with Italian literature ... According to Tassinari, both Florio and Shakespeare shared a fascination with Italy, with proverbs and with enriching English ...
Michel De Montaigne - Related Writers and Influence
... John Florio's translation of Montaigne's Essais became available to Shakespeare in English in 1603 ... Of The Caniballes translated by John Florio (1603) The Tempest Act 2, Scene 1 It is a nation, would I answer Plato, that hath no kinde of traffike, no ... on the Opinion We Have of Them translated by John Florio (1603) Hamlet Act 2, Scene 1 "Men...are tormented by the opinions they have of things, and not by things themselves" Hamlet Why, then, 'tis none to you for ...

Famous quotes containing the words florio and/or john:

    England is the paradise of women, the purgatory of men, and the hell of horses.
    —John Florio (c. 1553–1625)

    Ambivalence reaches the level of schizophrenia in our treatment of violence among the young. Parents do not encourage violence, but neither do they take up arms against the industries which encourage it. Parents hide their eyes from the books and comics, slasher films, videos and lyrics which form the texture of an adolescent culture. While all successful societies have inhibited instinct, ours encourages it. Or at least we profess ourselves powerless to interfere with it.
    —C. John Sommerville (20th century)