John F. Kennedy School of Government

The John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University (also known as Harvard Kennedy School and HKS) is a public policy and public administration school, and one of Harvard's graduate and professional schools. It offers master's degrees in public policy, public administration, and international development, grants several doctoral degrees, administers executive programs for senior government officials, and conducts research in subjects relating to politics, government, international affairs, and economics.

The School's primary campus is located off of John F. Kennedy Street in Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States. The main buildings overlook the Charles River, southwest of Harvard Yard and Harvard Square, on the site of a former MBTA Red Line trainyard. The School is adjacent to the public, riverfront John F. Kennedy Memorial Park.

Since 2004, the School's Dean has been David Ellwood, who is also the Scott M. Black Professor of Political Economy at HKS. Previously, Ellwood was an assistant secretary in the Department of Health and Human Services in the Clinton Administration.

Read more about John F. Kennedy School Of Government:  Centers, Notable Current and Former HKS Faculty, Student Life, Rankings

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