Joel Kovel - Eco-socialist Views - Critique of Other Forms of Green Politics and Socialism

Critique of Other Forms of Green Politics and Socialism

Kovel criticises many within the Green movement for not being overtly anti-capitalist, for working within the existing capitalist, statist system, for voluntarism, or for reliance on technological fixes. He suggests that eco-socialism differs from Green politics at the most fundamental level because the 'Four Pillars' of Green politics (and the 'Ten Key Values' of the US Green Party) do not include the demand for the emancipation of labour and the end of the separation between producers and the means of production.

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Other articles related to "socialism, socialisms, forms":

Joel Kovel - Eco-socialist Views - Critique of Other Forms of Green Politics and Socialism - Critique of 'Actually Existing Socialisms'
... For Kovel and Lowy, eco-socialism is "the realization of the 'first-epoch' socialisms" by resurrecting the notion of "free development of all producers", distancing ... Kovel believes that the forms of "actually existing socialism" consisted of "public ownership of the means of production", rather than meeting "the true definition" of socialism as "a free ...

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