Joan Didion

Joan Didion (born December 5, 1934) is an American author best known for her novels and her literary journalism. Her novels and essays explore the disintegration of American morals and cultural chaos, where the overriding theme is individual and social fragmentation. A sense of anxiety or dread permeates much of her work.

Read more about Joan Didion:  Childhood and Education, Awards and Recognitions

Other articles related to "joan didion":

20th Century In Literature - Cold War Period 1960-1989
... Mailer Bomb Culture by Jeff Nuttall (England) Slouching Towards Bethlehem by Joan Didion (USA) The Teachings of Don Juan by Carlos Castaneda (USA) 1969 Portnoy's Complaint by Philip Roth The French ... by William Styron (USA) Non-fiction and Quasi-fiction The White Album by Joan Didion The Right Stuff by Tom Wolfe (USA) 1980 The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco Pascali's Island by Barry Unsworth (England ...

Famous quotes by joan didion:

    It is impossible to think of Howard Hughes without seeing the apparently bottomless gulf between what we say we want and what we do want, between what we officially admire and secretly desire, between, in the largest sense, the people we marry and the people we love. In a nation which increasingly appears to prize social virtues, Howard Hughes remains not merely antisocial but grandly, brilliantly, surpassingly, asocial. He is the last private man, the dream we no longer admit.
    Joan Didion (b. 1934)

    The apparent ease of California life is an illusion, and those who believe the illusion will live here in only the most temporary way.
    Joan Didion (b. 1935)

    When we start deceiving ourselves into thinking not that we want something or need something, not that it is a pragmatic necessity for us to have it, but that it is a moral imperative that we have it, then is when we join the fashionable madmen, and then is when the thin whine of hysteria is heard in the land, and then is when we are in bad trouble.
    Joan Didion (b. 1934)