Jewish-American Princess Stereotype

Jewish-American Princess or Samantha Weinberg is a pejorative stereotype of a subtype of Jewish-American female. The term implies materialistic and selfish tendencies, attributed to a pampered or wealthy background.

Other articles related to "princess, stereotype":

Job's Daughters International - Stations (Officers) of The Bethel and Their Respective Duties
... Senior Princess - assists the Honored Queen in her duties ... Junior Princess - assists the Honored Queen in her duties ... Custodian - assists the Marshal with paraphernalia, assists the Senior Princess during initiation, and performs any duties assigned by the Honored Queen ...
Jewish-American Princess Stereotype - Criticism - Sexism and Discrimination
... The term Jewish-American Princess has been criticized for its sexist basis, and for pejoratively branding young adult Jewish-American women as spoiled and materialistic ... Concerns about incidents of the JAP stereotype being used pejoratively at colleges and universities have been noted in newspapers, magazines and academic journals ...
Emeka Anyaoku - Personal Life
... The Ichie Anyaoku has been married to Princess Bunmi Anyaoku since 1962 ... Princess Anyaoku is an Omoba of Abeokuta, Nigeria ... of one of Nigeria's most eligible bachelors and a beautiful young Princess educated in an English boarding school and Pitman College, London." ...
Camma
... On the Bravery of Women, Camma was a Galatian princess and priestess of Artemis ... (1661) is also the name of a play by Thomas Corneille, in which Camma is also a Galatian princess ... The Cup (1884), a tragedy by Tennyson, in which Camma is also a Galatian princess ...
Empress Michiko - Issue
... Crown Prince Naruhito 23 February 9 ... June 1993 Masako Owada Princess Toshi Prince Akishino 30 November 29 ... June 1990 Kiko Kawashima Princess Mako of Akishino Princess Kako ...

Famous quotes containing the words stereotype and/or princess:

    Once women begin to question the inevitability of their subordination and to reject the conventions formerly associated with it, they can no longer retreat to the safety of those conventions. The woman who rejects the stereotype of feminine weakness and dependence can no longer find much comfort in the cliché that all men are beasts. She has no choice except to believe, on the contrary, that men are human beings, and she finds it hard to forgive them when they act like animals.
    Christopher Lasch (b. 1932)

    At the next town
    the local princess was having a contest.
    A common way for princesses to marry.
    Fifty men had perished,
    gargling the sea like soup.
    Anne Sexton (1928–1974)