Japanese Tea Ceremony

The Japanese tea ceremony, also called the Way of Tea, is a Japanese cultural activity involving the ceremonial preparation and presentation of matcha, powdered green tea. In Japanese, it is called chanoyu (茶の湯?) or chadō, sadō (茶道?). The manner in which it is performed, or the art of its performance, is called otemae (お手前; お点前?). Zen Buddhism was a primary influence in the development of the tea ceremony. Much less commonly, it uses leaf tea, primarily sencha; see sencha tea ceremony, below.

Tea gatherings are classified as chakai (茶会?) or chaji (茶事?). A chakai is a relatively simple course of hospitality that includes confections, thin tea (薄茶, usucha?), and perhaps a light meal. A chaji is a much more formal gathering, usually including a full-course kaiseki meal followed by confections, thick tea (濃茶, koicha?), and thin tea. A chaji can last up to four hours.

Read more about Japanese Tea Ceremony:  History, Venues, Seasons, Koicha and usucha, Equipment, Usual Sequence of A chaji, Types of temae, Tea Ceremony and Calligraphy, Tea Ceremony and Flower Arrangement, Kaiseki (Cha-kaiseki), Tea Ceremony and Kimono, Tea Ceremony and seiza, Tea Ceremony and Tatami, Studying The Tea Ceremony, Terminology of 道 (dō) With Respect To Tea, Zen and Tea, Sencha Tea Ceremony

Other articles related to "japanese tea ceremony, japanese, ceremony, tea ceremony, tea":

Sen Shōan
1546 – October 10, 1614) was a Japanese tea ceremony master, and is distinguished in Japanese cultural history as the second generation in the Sen family tradition of Japanese tea ceremony founded ... was a resident of Sakai and was a master at playing the Japanese hand drum (tsutsumi) ... Sen Sōtan, the third generation in the Sen family tradition of Japanese tea ceremony ...
Japanese Tea Ceremony - Sencha Tea Ceremony
... This ceremony, more Chinese in style, was introduced to Japan in the 17th century by Ingen, the founder of the Ōbaku school of Zen Buddhism, which is in ... school, and the head temple of Manpuku-ji hosts regular sencha tea ceremony conventions ...
Daitoku-ji - History
... The dedication ceremony for the imperial supplication hall, with its newly added dharma hall and abbot's living quarters, was held in 1326, and this is ... closely linked to the master of the Japanese tea ceremony, Sen no Rikyū, and consequently to the realm of the Japanese tea ceremony ... another famous figure in the history of the Japanese tea ceremony who left his mark at this temple was Kobori Enshū ...
Tetsubin
... Tetsubin (鉄瓶) are Japanese cast iron pots having pouring spout and handle crossing over the top, used for boiling and pouring hot water for drinking purposes, such as for making tea ... In the Japanese art of chanoyu, the special portable brazier for this is the binkake (瓶掛) ... (See list of Japanese tea ceremony equipment) ...
Tetsubin - History
... the tetsubin pot grew alongside sencha, a form a leaf tea ... Sencha was not considered as formal as matcha, the common powdered green tea at the time ... people started drinking sencha as an informal setting for sharing a cup of tea with friends or family ...

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