International Association of Students in Agricultural and Related Sciences

The International Association of students in Agricultural and related Sciences (IAAS) is an international non-profit and non-governmental student society headquartered in Leuven, Belgium. It was founded in 1957 in Tunis by 8 countries. At the moment it is one of the world's biggest student organizations and one of the leading agricultural student associations. IAAS gathers students studying, majoring or researching in agriculture and related areas like environmental sciences, forestry, food science, landscape architecture etc. Its committees are spread in universities in over 40 countries worldwide.

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International Association Of Students In Agricultural And Related Sciences - History - Chronology of The Annual World Congresses
1957 First International Congress in Tunis (Tunisia), foundation of IAAS (then AIEA) by Germany, Finland, The Netherlands, Norway, Rumania, Switzerland, Czechoslovakia and ... and Sweden Special event Executive Committee of the association formed by the President, Vice President and Secretary General, working in Headquarter in Leuven (Belgium), also ...

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