Inspector Ghote's First Case - Literary Significance & Criticism

Literary Significance & Criticism

The Times newspaper's book review has an article entitled "Times Summer Books: Mysteries" written by Alexander McCall Smith. The article mentions the release of "Inspector Ghote's First Case", but refers rather to the entire Inspector Ghote series instead of this specific novel. Smith refers to H. R. F. Keating's work as the crime novel reviewer for The Times and calls the series: "exquisite, gentle novels that should find their place on any list of good crime fiction."

Allison & Busby, the novel's publisher, quotes favourable reviews from The Spectator, The Sunday Telegraph, The News of the World, Literary Review, Shots and the Birmingham Post on its website.

Mike Ripley's Crime File for May 2008 includes a review of the novel which refers to "…Keating's great skill as a writer, portraying with a graceful lightness of touch and great affection."

Read more about this topic:  Inspector Ghote's First Case

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Felix Holt, The Radical - Literary Significance & Criticism
... However, upon the story's release, some criticism was drawn to its less-than-substantial focus on politics, although this itself can be argued as representing an underlying theme in the book ...

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