Inspector Ghote Hunts The Peacock - Characters in "Inspector Ghote Hunts The Peacock"

Characters in "Inspector Ghote Hunts The Peacock"

Inspector Ganesh Ghote: A hard working Indian Police Inspector who normally lives and works in Mumbai, India.

Johnny Bull: A fading pop music star who is now in his thirties, he is trying to change his look in the hope it will help him appeal to the younger generation. His new look includes an Indian aesthetic. He became addicted to opium on a trip to India, where he met Ranee.

Ranee "Peacock" Datta: A 17 year old girl raised in both India and the United Kingdom. She is missing throughout the novel but her character is central to the plot. She is very western in her attitudes, described as being bright and confident with a love of new clothes and pop music, particularly Johnny Bull's.

Jack Smith: Eldest of the Smith brothers, a criminal trio who run a protection racket and who are possibly involved with drugs.

Pete Smith: Described as "not right in the head" by Ghote's informant, Pete keeps a dangerous dog and appears to be mentally disabled. He is, however, very strong.

Billy Smith: Youngest of the Smith brothers, Pete flirted with Ranee but failed to achieve a relationship.

Mrs Smith: Mother to the Smith brothers, who live at home with her. She appears to have a frank and open relationship with them concerning their criminal activities, of which she is happy to accept the benefits.

Sandra: Johnny Bull's new girlfriend and a white British girl the same age as Ranee. Hostile to Ghote's investigation and protective of Johnny Bull, she is willing to bully Johnny when it comes to his career and drug habit.

Robin: Owner and bartender of the "Robin's Nest". Also a dealer in opium who supplies the Peacock and Vidur Datta.

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