Indigenous Intellectual Property

Indigenous intellectual property is an umbrella legal term used in national and international forums to identify indigenous peoples' special rights to claim (from within their own laws) all that their indigenous groups know now, have known, or will know.

It is a concept that has developed out of a predominantly western legal tradition, and has most recently been promoted by the World Intellectual Property Organisation, as part of a more general United Nations push to see the diverse wealth of this world's indigenous, intangible cultural heritage better valued and better protected against perceived, ongoing misappropriation and misuse.

Nation states across the world have difficulties reconciling locally indigenous traditions, laws and cultural norms with predominantly western legal systems, effectively leaving indigenous peoples' individual and communal intellectual property rights largely unprotected.

Read more about Indigenous Intellectual PropertyDeclarations Regarding Indigenous Intellectual Property, United Nations Declaration On The Rights of Indigenous Peoples

Other articles related to "intellectuals, intellectual, intellectual property, indigenous intellectual property, property, indigenous":

Public Intellectual Life - Bioethics and Public Intellectualism
... It has been suggested that public intellectuals bridge the gap between the academic elite and the educated public, particularly when concerning issues in the natural sciences, such as genetics and ... differences between academics, in the traditional sense, and public intellectuals ... This has become known as "the academisation of intellectual life" ...
Societal Views On Intellectual Property
... Intellectual property (IP) is a legal concept which refers to creations of the mind for which exclusive rights are recognized ... Under intellectual property law, owners are granted certain exclusive rights to a variety of intangible assets, such as musical, literary, and ... Common types of intellectual property rights include copyright, trademarks, patents, industrial design rights, trade dress, and in some jurisdictions trade secrets ...
Indigenous Intellectual Property - Examples of Indigenous Peoples Defending Their Intellectual Property - Hopi & Apache Opt Out From American Museums
... American tribes ordered a number of museums to close their intellectual property to the public ... They were backed by the NAGPRA.They would disclose their property only after permission was requested directly to them ...
Tui (intellectual)
... A Tui is an intellectual who sells his or her abilities and opinions as a commodity in the marketplace or who uses them to support the dominant ideology of an oppressive society ... material that he developed in the mid-1930s for his so-called Tui-Novel—an unfinished satire on intellectuals in the German Empire and Weimar Republic—an ... a neologism that results from the acronym of a word play on "intellectual" ("Tellekt-Ual-In") ...
Traditional Knowledge - Property Rights - Indigenous Intellectual Property
... Indigenous intellectual property is an umbrella legal term used in national and international forums to identify indigenous peoples' special rights to claim (from within their own laws) all that their indigenous ... predominantly western legal tradition, and has most recently been promoted by the World Intellectual Property Organisation, as part of a more general United ... the United Nations International Year for the World's Indigenous Peoples (1993) then during the following United Nations Decade of the World's Indigenous Peoples (1995–2004) a number of conferences of ...

Famous quotes containing the words property, indigenous and/or intellectual:

    It is as if being was to be observed,
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    My case is a species of madness, only that it is a derangement of the Volition, & not of the intellectual faculties.
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