Impact of Health On Intelligence

Impact Of Health On Intelligence

Health can affect intelligence in various ways. This is one of the most important factors in understanding the origins of human group differences in IQ test scores and other measures of cognitive ability. Several factors can lead to significant cognitive impairment, particularly if they occur during pregnancy and childhood when the brain is growing and the blood–brain barrier is less effective. Such impairment may sometimes be permanent, sometimes be partially or wholly compensated for by later growth.

Developed nations have implemented several health policies regarding nutrients and toxins known to influence cognitive function. These include laws requiring fortification of certain food products and laws establishing safe levels of pollutants (e.g. lead, mercury, and organochlorides). Comprehensive policy recommendations targeting reduction of cognitive impairment in children have been proposed.

Improvements in nutrition, and in public policy in general, have been implicated in worldwide IQ increases (the Flynn effect).

Read more about Impact Of Health On Intelligence:  Nutrition, Healthcare During Pregnancy and Childbirth, Stress, Infectious Diseases, Effects of Other Diseases, Other Associations

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