IEEE Computer Society Press

IEEE Computer Society Press

The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE, read I-Triple-E) is a professional association headquartered in New York City that is dedicated to advancing technological innovation and excellence. It has more than 400,000 members in more than 160 countries, about 51.4% of whom reside in the United States.

Read more about IEEE Computer Society Press:  History, Publications, Educational Activities, Standards and Development Process, Membership and Member Grades, Awards, Societies, Technical Councils, Technical Committees, Organizational Units, IEEE Foundation, Copyright Policy

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IEEE Computer Society Press - Copyright Policy
... The IEEE requires authors to transfer their copyright for works they submit for publication ... The IEEE generally does not create its own research ... The IEEE then publishes the authors' papers in journals and other proceedings, and authors are required to give up their exclusive rights to their works ...

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