Ide, Devon - Ide, As Described in White's Devonshire Directory (1850)

Ide, As Described in White's Devonshire Directory (1850)

"IDE, a neat and pleasant village, in a picturesque village, 2 miles S.S.W. of Exeter, has in its parish 795 souls, and 1408A. 3R. 17P. of fertile land, mostly the property of the Dean and Chapter of Exeter, who are lords of the manor, appropriators of the rectory, and patrons of the perpetual curacy, which was valued in 1831 at £180 per annum, and is now held by the Rev. J.J. Erle, LL.B., who has a neat thatched residence, and 2A. of glebe. The great tithes were commuted in 1840 for £180, and the small tithes for £170 per annum, The Church (St. Ida,) was rebuilt in 1834, at the cost of about £1300, and has 550 sittings, of which 300 are free. It is a neat cemented structure, with a tower and four bells. Those beautiful and romantic grounds called Fordlands, which are often visited by pleasure parties from Exeter, are in this parish, . . . They are the property of J.H.W. Abbott, Esq. Here is a school, partly supported by subscription; and the poor parishioners have two yearly rent-charges, viz., 20s. out of a field at Lower Whiddon, left by Peter Balle, in 1648; and £2. 12s., left by Wm. Smith, out of three houses at Exeter."

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