Ice Axes

Some articles on ice axe, axe, ice axes, ice:

History of The Ice Axe
... The antecedent of the ice axe was the alpenstock, a long wooden pole with an iron spike tip, used by shepherds for travel on snowfields and glaciers in ... show Balmat carrying two separate tools that would later be merged into the ice axe – an alpenstock (or baton) and a small axe that could be used to chop steps on icy slopes ... According to the earliest manufacturer of ice axes, Grivel, these two tools were merged to create the first true ice axe around 1840 ...
Ice Axe
... An ice axe is a multi-purpose ice and snow tool used by mountaineers both in the ascent and descent of routes which involve frozen conditions ... In its simplest role, the ice axe is used like a walking stick in the uphill hand, the mountaineer holding the head in the centre, with the pick pointing to the rear ... known as pigeon holes), as well as scoop seats in the hillside and trenches to bury an ice axe belay ...
Ice Tool - Design
... The physical designs of ice tools differ more widely than those of other ice axes ... Modular Ice tools are extremely modular most have the ability to change picks and adze/hammer ... Many ice tools are designed to accommodate shaft modifications to change the position of a hand while hanging ...

Famous quotes containing the words axes and/or ice:

    The difference between style and taste is never easy to define, but style tends to be centered on the social, and taste upon the individual. Style then works along axes of similarity to identify group membership, to relate to the social order; taste works within style to differentiate and construct the individual. Style speaks about social factors such as class, age, and other more flexible, less definable social formations; taste talks of the individual inflection of the social.
    John Fiske (b. 1939)

    “The room’s very hot, with all this crowd,” the Professor said to Sylvie. “I wonder why they don’t put some lumps of ice in the grate? You fill it with lumps of coal in the winter, you know, and you sit round it and enjoy the warmth. How jolly it would be to fill it now with lumps of ice, and sit round it and enjoy the coolth!”
    Lewis Carroll [Charles Lutwidge Dodgson] (1832–1898)