Huxley

Huxley may refer to:

Read more about Huxley:  People, Geography, Education, Other Uses

Other articles related to "huxley":

Mind At Large
... and Heaven and Hell by Aldous Huxley ... In this book, Huxley explores the idea that the human mind filters reality, partly because handling the details of all of the impressions and images coming in would ... Huxley was administered mescaline, and had an interviewer prompt him to comment on various stimuli around him, such as books and flowers ...
Star Riders' Championship - Results
... Year 1st 2nd 3rd 1929 (Overseas) Frank Arthur beat Vic Huxley 1929 (Britain) Roger Frogley beat Jack Parker 1930 Vic Huxley beat Frank Arthur 1931 Ray Tauser Vic Huxley Tommy Croombs 1932 Eric ...
Laura Huxley - Life and Career
... Times, Archera called philosopher and author Aldous Huxley at home, saying that John Huston had promised to finance her proposed documentary film on the ... Archera then became close friends with Huxley and his first wife Maria, who died in 1955 ... In 1956, Archera married Huxley ...
Laura Huxley
... Laura Huxley (née Archera) (November 2, 1911 – December 13, 2007) was an Italian-American musician, author, psychological counselor and lecturer, and the wife of author Aldous Huxley ...
Huxley, Alberta - Demographics
... As a designated place in the 2011 Census, Huxley had a population of 85 living in 35 of its 41 total dwellings, a -4.5% change from its 2006 population of 89 ...

Famous quotes containing the word huxley:

    I tell you, you’re ruining that boy. You’re ruining him. Why can’t you do as much for me?
    S.J. Perelman, U.S. screenwriter, Bert Kalmar, Harry Ruby, and Norman Z. McLeod. Groucho Marx, Horsefeathers, a wisecrack made as Huxley College president to Connie, the college widow (Thelma Todd)

    One of the great triumphs of the nineteenth century was to limit the connotation of the word “immoral” in such a way that, for practical purposes, only those were immoral who drank too much or made too copious love. Those who indulged in any or all of the other deadly sins could look down in righteous indignation on the lascivious and the gluttonous.... In the name of all lechers and boozers I most solemnly protest against the invidious distinction made to our prejudice.
    —Aldous Huxley (1894–1963)

    No slavery can be abolished without a double emancipation, and the master will benefit by freedom more than the freed-man.
    —Thomas Henry Huxley (1825–95)