Husband - Origin and Etymology

Origin and Etymology

The term husband refers to Middle English huseband, from Old English hūsbōnda, from Old Norse hūsbōndi (hūs, "house" + bōndi, būandi, present participle of būa, "to dwell", so, etymologically, "a householder").

Read more about this topic:  Husband

Other articles related to "origin and etymology, origins":

Jade Emperor - Chinese Mythology - Origin
... After 1,550 kalpas, each kalpa lasting for 129,600 years, he attained Golden Immortality ... After another one hundred million years of cultivation, he finally became the Jade Emperor ...
French Livre - History - Origin and Etymology
... This first livre is known as the livre carolienne ... Only deniers were initially minted but debasement led to larger denominations being issued ...
Origin - Other Uses
... Origen (185–254), early Christian scholar and theologian Origins Game Fair, an annual board game event in Columbus Ohio Origins Award, presented by the Academy of Adventure Gaming Arts and Design at the Origins Game ...
Walk-in - Origin
... Subsequently, a belief system grew up around the walk-in ... It included New Age attributes such as the concept of ascending into higher frequencies of evolution, a variety of psi powers, traditional "predictions regarding Earth Changes" first cited in the Bible (Book of Daniel and the Book of Revelation) but popularized by Edgar Cayce, and predictions of dire fates for those whose vibrational levels remain unraised ...
Cool Story Bro - Origin and Etymology - In Other Languages
... In Japanese, tsuri (釣り?) means "fishing" and refers to intentionally misleading posts whose only purpose is to get the readers to react, i.e ... get trolled ...

Famous quotes containing the words etymology and/or origin:

    The universal principle of etymology in all languages: words are carried over from bodies and from the properties of bodies to express the things of the mind and spirit. The order of ideas must follow the order of things.
    Giambattista Vico (1688–1744)

    Each structure and institution here was so primitive that you could at once refer it to its source; but our buildings commonly suggest neither their origin nor their purpose.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)