Hungarian Nobility

Some articles on hungarian nobility, nobility, hungarian:

History Of Maramureş - 1526-1690
... took hold in Transylvania, especially among the Hungarian nobility ... in 1526–1571 over different parts of the disintegrating Kingdom of Hungary, the Protestant nobility of Transylvania and the Catholic Austria often clashed, with the latter slowly gaining the ... The pro-independence policy of the Hungarian-Transylvanian nobility provoked an Ottoman invasion in 1566 ...
Battle Of Miriszló
... led by Michael the Brave supported by ethnic Hungarian Szeklers and the troops of Austrian general Giorgio Basta supported by the Hungarian nobility of Transylvania ... In 1600, Hungarian noblemen from Transylvania rebelled against Michael and gathered an army near Gyulafehérvár (currently Alba Iulia) ... The troops of Basta joined the Hungarian noblemen rebelling against Michael ...
History Of Transylvania - Modern Era - Early Modern Era: Transylvania As An Autonomous Principality
... Main articles Eastern Hungarian Kingdom, Treaty of Speyer (1570), and Principality of Transylvania (1571–1711) When the main Hungarian army and King ... John Zápolya founded the Eastern Hungarian Kingdom (1538–1570) out of which the Principality of Transylvania arose ... Empire, Principality of Transylvania, where mostly Hungarian princes, who paid the Turks tribute, ruled with considerable autonomy and where Austrian and Turkish influences vied for supremacy for nearly two centuries ...
Beatrice Of Naples - Biography
... fleet seized Otranto in the Kingdom of Naples, at the earnest solicitation of the pope he sent the Hungarian general, Balázs Magyar, to recover the fortress, which ... took Ancona under his protection for a while, occupying it with a Hungarian garrison ... his death in 1490, Beatrice managed to keep a power position by the support of the Hungarian nobility and continue as queen of Hungary by marriage to the next ...

Famous quotes containing the word nobility:

    I have come to the conclusion that the closer people are to what may be called the front lines of government ... the easier it is to see the immediate underbrush, the individual tree trunks of the moment, and to forget the nobility the usefulness and the wide extent of the forest itself.... They forget that politics after all is only an instrument through which to achieve Government.
    Franklin D. Roosevelt (1882–1945)