Hours of Service - Log Book

Log Book

Every driver of a CMV is required to keep track of his/her time with a log book or an EOBR. A log book is simply a notebook with a grid pattern on every page, dividing the 24-hour day into 15-minute (1/4-hour) segments. Drivers are required to make carbon copies of each page, so one page may be kept with the driver (to be produced upon inspection by DOT officers), and so the other copy may be sent to the driver's employer.

An electronic on-board recorder can be thought of as an automated electronic log book. An EOBR records the same information as a manual paper log book, and requires less input from the driver. The EOBR automatically records driving time and location, leaving the driver responsible only for reporting on-duty and off-duty time. In these respects, the EOBR is less susceptible to forgery than a paper log book.

FMCSA rules require that a log book (or EOBR) must record for each change of duty status (e.g., the place of reporting for work, or starting to drive), the name of the city, town or village, with state abbreviation. If a change of duty status occurs at a location other than a city, the highway number and nearest milepost or the nearest two intersecting roadways followed by the name of the nearest city must be recorded. In addition to the time grid, a log book must record the date, total miles driven for the day, truck and trailer number, name of carrier, bill of lading number, and the driver's signature. The driver is required to retain a copy of each log page for the previous seven consecutive days which must be in his/her possession and available for inspection while on-duty.

Read more about this topic:  Hours Of Service

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