Houghton Lake Heights

Some articles on houghton lake heights, heights, houghton lake:

Houghton Lake Heights, Michigan - History - Business
... The Houghton Lake Heights also offered many services in the early to mid 1900s ... According to Beulah Carman The Heights merchants, because of the variety of stores, hotels, and other attractions, enjoyed a thriving business during the mid-twenties and the thirties ... Hall, Akin's Hotel, Parker's Barbershop and post office, The Heights Inn, Ray Walling's garage and gas station, Girley's Gift Shop, Tam-a-rack Lodge and Anderson ...
M-55 (Michigan Highway) - Business Loop
... BUS M-55 Location Houghton Lake Heights Length 2.898 mi (4.664 km) Existed Early 1950–Late 1961 Business M-55 (BUS M-55) was a business loop designated for just over a decade in Houghton Lake ... BUS M-55 ran for 2.898 miles (4.664 km) along Houghton Lake Drive between US 27 and Federal Drive next to the Houghton Lake ... M-55 was shifted off the road when several highways in the Houghton Lake area were rerouted ...

Famous quotes containing the words heights, houghton and/or lake:

    Give me the keys. I feel for the common chord again,
    Sliding by semi-tones till I sink to a minor,—yes,
    And I blunt it into a ninth, and I stand on alien ground,
    Surveying a while the heights I rolled from into the deep;
    Which, hark, I have dared and done, for my resting-place is found,
    The C Major of this life: so, now I will try to sleep.
    Robert Browning (1812–1889)

    It seemed like this was one big Prozac nation, one big mess of malaise. Perhaps the next time half a million people gather for a protest march on the White House green it will not be for abortion rights or gay liberation, but because we’re all so bummed out.
    Elizabeth Wurtzel, U.S. author. Prozac Nation: Young and Depressed in America, p. 298, Houghton Mifflin (1994)

    Will lovely, lively, virginal today
    Shatter for us with a wing’s drunken blow
    This hard, forgotten lake haunted in snow
    By the sheer ice of flocks not flown away!
    Stéphane Mallarmé (1842–1898)