Honeywell - History - Performance Materials and Technologies

Performance Materials and Technologies

Honeywell’s Performance Materials and Technologies business can trace its heritage to a small sulfuric acid company started by chemist William H. Nichols in 1870. By the end of the 19th century, Nichols had formed several companies and was recognized as a force in America’s fledgling chemical industry. Nichols’s vision of a bigger, better chemical company took off when he teamed up with investor Eugene Meyer in 1920. Nichols and Meyer combined five smaller chemical companies to create the Allied Chemical & Dye Company, which later became Allied Chemical Corp., and eventually became part of AlliedSignal, the forerunner of Honeywell’s Performance Materials and Technologies business. Meyer went on to serve in the Coolidge, Hoover and Truman administrations and to buy the Washington Post newspaper in 1933. Both he and Nichols have buildings named after them in Honeywell’s headquarters in Morristown, N.J. Andreas Kramvis is the current President and CEO of the Performance Materials and Technologies division.

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