History of The Lutheran Church of Australia

The history of the Lutheran Church of Australia is the sequence of events related to divisions, mergers and affiliations of Lutheran church organisations from the time Lutheranism first arrived in Australia, to the time of unification of the two main synods in 1966.

Read more about History Of The Lutheran Church Of Australia:  First Lutheran Body in Australia (Kavel-Fritzsche Synod), Division Into Immanuel Synod and The Evangelical Lutheran Synod of Australia, Evangelical Lutheran Church of Australia, Lutherans in Victoria, General Synod and The Immanuel Synod, Lutherans in Queensland, United Evangelical Lutheran Church in Australia, Merge of UELCA and ELCA Into The Lutheran Church of Australia

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History Of The Lutheran Church Of Australia - Merge of UELCA and ELCA Into The Lutheran Church of Australia
... The final merge occurred in Tanunda, South Australia, at a joint synod held on 29 October to 2 November 1966 ... The merged organization was named the Lutheran Church of Australia (LCA) ... In 1973, the Lutheran Church of Australia published its first hymnal, the 'Lutheran Hymnal', revised in the mid-1980s into the present hymn book, the Lutheran Hymnal with Supplement ...

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