History of South African Nationality

History Of South African Nationality

South African nationality has been influenced primarily by the racial dynamics that have structured South African society throughout its development. The country's colonial history led to the immigration (or importation) of different racial and ethnic groups into one shared area. Power dispersion and inter-group relations led to European dominance of the state, allowing it to directly shape nationality although not without internal division or influence from the less empowered races.

Read more about History Of South African NationalityDutch Colonial Rule, British Colonial Rule, Apartheid Policies Regarding Race, Post-Apartheid, Citizenship

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History Of South African Nationality - Citizenship
... South African citizenship has primarily been founded on conceptions of racial entitlement and lawful residence ... the Boer Republics provided the precursor to South African citizenship Union nationality ... in the early 20th century provided the unidirectional basis of South African citizenship ...

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