History of South African Nationality

History Of South African Nationality

South African nationality has been influenced primarily by the racial dynamics that have structured South African society throughout its development. The country's colonial history led to the immigration (or importation) of different racial and ethnic groups into one shared area. Power dispersion and inter-group relations led to European dominance of the state, allowing it to directly shape nationality although not without internal division or influence from the less empowered races.

Read more about History Of South African NationalityDutch Colonial Rule, British Colonial Rule, Apartheid Policies Regarding Race, Post-Apartheid, Citizenship

Other articles related to "history of south african nationality, south, nationality":

History Of South African Nationality - Citizenship
... South African citizenship has primarily been founded on conceptions of racial entitlement and lawful residence ... racial groups in the Cape and the Boer Republics provided the precursor to South African citizenship Union nationality ... to the influx of Asian in the early 20th century provided the unidirectional basis of South African citizenship ...

Famous quotes containing the words history of, nationality, african, south and/or history:

    Tell me of the height of the mountains of the moon, or of the diameter of space, and I may believe you, but of the secret history of the Almighty, and I shall pronounce thee mad.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    If nationality is consent, the state is compulsion.
    Henri-Frédéric Amiel (1821–1881)

    We live in a highly industrialized society and every member of the Black nation must be as academically and technologically developed as possible. To wage a revolution, we need competent teachers, doctors, nurses, electronics experts, chemists, biologists, physicists, political scientists, and so on and so forth. Black women sitting at home reading bedtime stories to their children are just not going to make it.
    Frances Beale, African American feminist and civil rights activist. The Black Woman, ch. 14 (1970)

    Indeed, I believe that in the future, when we shall have seized again, as we will seize if we are true to ourselves, our own fair part of commerce upon the sea, and when we shall have again our appropriate share of South American trade, that these railroads from St. Louis, touching deep harbors on the gulf, and communicating there with lines of steamships, shall touch the ports of South America and bring their tribute to you.
    Benjamin Harrison (1833–1901)

    When the landscape buckles and jerks around, when a dust column of debris rises from the collapse of a block of buildings on bodies that could have been your own, when the staves of history fall awry and the barrel of time bursts apart, some turn to prayer, some to poetry: words in the memory, a stained book carried close to the body, the notebook scribbled by hand—a center of gravity.
    Adrienne Rich (b. 1929)