History of Ivory Coast

History Of Ivory Coast

The date of the first human presence in Ivory Coast (also officially called Côte d'Ivoire) has been difficult to determine because human remains have not been well preserved in the country's humid climate. However, the presence of old weapon and tool fragments (specifically, polished axes cut through shale and remnants of cooking and fishing) in the country has been interpreted as a possible indication of a large human presence during the Upper Paleolithic period (15,000 to 10,000 BC), or at the minimum, the Neolithic period. The earliest known inhabitants of Côte d'Ivoire, however, have left traces scattered throughout the territory. Historians believe that they were all either displaced or absorbed by the ancestors of the present inhabitants. Peoples who arrived before the 16th century include the Ehotilé (Aboisso), Kotrowou (Fresco), Zéhiri (Grand Lahou), Ega and Diès (Divo).

Read more about History Of Ivory Coast:  Prehistory and Early History, Trade With Europe and The Americas, Establishment of French Rule, French Colonial Era, Independence, After Houphouët-Boigny, First Civil War, Second Civil War

Other articles related to "history of ivory coast":

History Of Ivory Coast - Second Civil War
... International organizations reported numerous instances of human rights violations by both sides, in particular in the city of Duékoué ... The UN and French forces took military action, with the stated objective to protect their forces and civilians ...

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