History of Fire Safety Legislation in The United Kingdom

The history of fire safety legislation in the United Kingdom formally covers the period from the formation of the united kingdom of Great Britain in 1707, but is founded in the history of such legislation in England and Wales and Scotland prior to the Union.

While much British legislation applied to the United Kingdom as a whole, Scotland and Northern Ireland often had their own versions of the legislation, with slight differences.

Read more about History Of Fire Safety Legislation In The United KingdomLegislation From Predecessor States

Other articles related to "legislation, fire":

History Of Fire Safety Legislation In The United Kingdom - From 1707 - Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005 - Scotland and Northern Ireland
... The equivalent legislation in Scotland to the Regulatory Reform Order is the Fire (Scotland) Act 2005 ... Its scope (in Scotland) covers what the RRO and the Fire and Rescue Services Act 2004 covers in England and Wales ... Part 3 of the act deals specifically with fire safety ...

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