History of Baseball in The United States

The history of baseball in the United States can be traced to the 18th century, when amateurs played a baseball-like game by their own informal rules using improvised equipment. The popularity of the sport inspired the semipro and professional baseball clubs in the 1860s.

Read more about History Of Baseball In The United States:  Early History, Growth, Professionalism, Rise of The Major Leagues, The Dead-ball Era: 1900 To 1919, Overview, The Negro Leagues, Babe Ruth and The End of The Dead-ball Era, The War Years, Racial Integration in Baseball, The Major Leagues Move West, Pitching Dominance and Rules Changes, Players Assert Themselves, The Marketing and Hype Era

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