History of African Americans in Atlanta

History Of African Americans In Atlanta

Atlanta has long been known as a center of black wealth, political power and culture; a cradle of the Civil Rights Movement and home to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. It has often been called a "black mecca".

Read more about History Of African Americans In Atlanta:  Demographics, Political Power, Education, Upper Class, Culture, History, External Links

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History Of African Americans In Atlanta - External Links
... National Park Service - African American experience in Atlanta Atlanta History Timeline Carole Merritt, "African Americans in Atlanta Community Building in a New South City," Southern Spaces ... Carter, The Black Side a partial history of the business, religious, and educational side of the Negro in Atlanta, Ga. 1894) History of Atlanta Origins Standing Peachtree Western and Atlantic Railroad (1836) Buildings Historic districts Buildings listed on National Register (Atlanta ...

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