Hip Examination - Movement

Movement

  • Internal rotation - with knee and hip both flexed at 90 degrees the ankle is abducted.
  • External rotation - with knee and hip both flexed at 90 degrees the ankle is adducted. (also done with the Patrick's test / FABER test)
  • Flexion (also known as the Gaenslen's test)
  • Extension - done with the patient on their side. Alignment should be assessed by palpation of the ASIS, PSIS and greater trochanter.
  • Abduction - assessed whilst palpating the contralateral ASIS.
  • Adduction - assessed whilst palpating the ipsilateral ASIS.
  • Assessment for a hidden flexion contracture of the hip - hip flexion contractures may be occult, due to compensation by the back. They are assessed by:
    1. Placing a hand behind the lumbar region of back
    2. Getting the patient to fully flex the contralateral hip.
    3. The hand in the lumbar region is used to confirm the back is straightened (flexed relative to the anatomic position). If there is a flexion contracture in the ipsilateral hip it should be evident, as the hip will appear flexed.

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