Highland

Highland

The term highland(s) or upland(s) is used to denote any mountainous region or elevated mountainous plateau. Generally speaking, the term upland (or uplands) tends to be used for ranges of hills, typically up to 500-600m, and highland (or highlands) for ranges of low mountains.

Read more about Highland:  Climate, Highlands Worldwide

Other articles related to "highland":

Highland High School (Highland, Indiana) - Highlights
... in the Class 4A Northwest Crossroad Conference and Highland High School would like to recognize the proud achievement of 2012 State Champions in the Girls Tennis Doubles Aby and Vanessa Madrigal and 2012 State ... Highland High School also has many extra curricular activities for students ... The Highland Theatre Company, School Town of Highland Orchestra and many clubs are offered ...
Isunngua - Geography
... The highland is bounded from the north by the Isunnguata Sermia glacier, from the south by Russell Glacier and Aajuitsup Tasia lake, and from the west by Sanningasoq twin lake ... The average height of the highland hills is approximately 500–530 metres (1,600–1,740 ft) ... The highland is dotted with freshwater lakes, kettles, and meltwater outflow lakes saturated with glacial silt ...
Highland Cathedral
... Highland Cathedral is a popular melody for the great highland bagpipe ... Highland Cathedral is Chris Patten's favourite pipe tune, as said by himself on a BBC Asia Today programme ...
Highland, Maryland
... Highland is an unincorporated community in western Howard County, Maryland which uses the 20777 zip code ... The community is located at the junction of Highland Road, Maryland Route 216 and Maryland Route 108, and is still heavily influenced by its ... historical sites and feel of the hamlet by founding the Greater Highland Crossroads Association (GHCA) in 2002 ...

Famous quotes containing the word highland:

    If you would feel the full force of a tempest, take up your residence on the top of Mount Washington, or at the Highland Light, in Truro.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)