Herbert Henry Messenger

Herbert Henry Messenger

Herbert Henry "Dally" Messenger (12 April 1883 – 24 November 1959) was one of Australasia's first professional rugby footballers, recognised as one of the greatest ever players in either code. Messenger, or 'The Master' as he was dubbed, represented his country in two rugby union tests and seven rugby league tests. He played for New South Wales in the very first rugby match run by the newly-created 'New South Wales Rugby Football League' which had just split away from the established New South Wales Rugby Football Union.

Messenger had a stocky build, and while standing only about 172 cm (5 ft 7') in height, he was a powerful runner of the ball and solid defender. According to his peers the centre's greatest attributes were his unpredictability and astonishing physical co-ordination, coupled with a freakish ability to kick goals from almost any part of the ground. He was a teetotaller and non-smoker during his career and other than breakfast, Messenger would rarely eat before a match.

Read more about Herbert Henry Messenger:  Early Life, Rugby Union, Rugby League, Life After Football, Accolades

Other articles related to "herbert henry messenger, messenger":

Herbert Henry Messenger - Accolades
... was presented initially in 1936 and depicted Messenger, along with three other pioneering greats of the code, namely Jean Galia (France), Albert Baskiville (New Zealand) and ... Sydney Cricket Ground has also named after Messenger, in recognition of his many outstanding games of club and representative football ... In 2004, the Royal Agricultural Society Shield held by Messenger's family became part of the National Museum of Australia collection ...

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