Helms Foundation College Basketball Player of The Year

The Helms Foundation College Basketball Player of the Year was an annual basketball award given to the most outstanding intercollegiate men's basketball player in the United States. The award was first given following the 1904–05 season and ceased being awarded after the 1978–79 season. It was the first major most valuable player (MVP) award for men's basketball in the United States, and the Helms Athletic Foundation was considered within the basketball community to be the authority on men's college basketball for that era. Thus, the award was viewed as the premier player of the year award one could receive up until the 1960s, at which point the Naismith College Player of the Year and John R. Wooden Award took over as the penultimate season MVP awards.

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Helms Foundation College Basketball Player Of The Year - Winners
... Season Player School Position Class 1904–05 Steinmetz, ChristianChristian Steinmetz* Wisconsin Forward 1905–06 Grebenstein, GeorgeGeorge Grebenstein Dartmouth Forward 3 !Junior 1906–07 ... Black Kansas Guard 4 !Senior 1924–25 Mueller, EarlEarl Mueller Colorado College Center 4 !Senior 1925–26 Cobb, JackJack Cobb North Carolina Forward 4 !Senior 1926–27 ...

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