Greek National Road

Some articles on greek national road, greek, road, national:

Larissa (regional Unit) - Transport
... Greek National Road 1/E75, SE, Cen ... E - partially a divided superhighway Greek National Road 3, S, Cen ... NW Motorway 3 - future Greek National Road 6, W, Cen ...
Greek National Road 51
... Greek National Road 51 (Greek Εθνική Οδός 51, abbreviated as EO51) is a single carriageway road in northeastern Greece ... It connects the Greek National Road 2 (Florina - Thessaloniki - Alexandroupoli - Turkey) near Feres with the Bulgarian border near Ormenio ...
Zdravljica
... in 1848, is a poem by the Slovene Romantic poet France Prešeren, considered the national poet of Slovenes ... On 27 September 1989, it became the national anthem of Slovenia ... of a united Slovenia, which the March Revolution in 1848 elevated into a national political programme ...
Aigialeia - Transport - Roads
... The main highways in Aigialeia are Greek National Road 8, old road Athens - Corinth - Rio - Patras Greek National Road 8A (part of E55 and E65) Athens - Corinth ...
Orienteering - Governing Bodies - National
... These national bodies are the rule-making body for that nation ... For example the British Orienteering Federation is the national governing body for the United Kingdom ...

Famous quotes containing the words road, greek and/or national:

    Who does not see that I have taken a road along which I shall go, without stopping and without effort, as long as there is ink and paper in the world? I cannot keep a record of my life by my actions; fortune places them too low. I keep it by my thoughts.
    Michel de Montaigne (1533–1592)

    So you may say,
    Greek flower; Greek ecstasy
    reclaims for ever
    one who died
    following
    intricate songs’ lost measure.”
    Hilda Doolittle (1886–1961)

    Maybe it’s understandable what a history of failures America’s foreign policy has been. We are, after all, a country full of people who came to America to get away from foreigners. Any prolonged examination of the U.S. government reveals foreign policy to be America’s miniature schnauzer—a noisy but small and useless part of the national household.
    —P.J. (Patrick Jake)