Gravitation (astronomy) - History of Gravitational Theory

History of Gravitational Theory

Classical mechanics
History of classical mechanics
Timeline of classical mechanics
Branches
  • Statics
  • Dynamics / Kinetics
  • Kinematics
  • Applied mechanics
  • Celestial mechanics
  • Continuum mechanics
  • Statistical mechanics
Formulations
  • Newtonian mechanics (Vectorial mechanics)
  • Analytical mechanics:
    • Lagrangian mechanics
    • Hamiltonian mechanics
Fundamental concepts
  • Space
  • Time
  • Mass
  • Inertia
  • Velocity
  • Speed
  • Acceleration
  • Force
  • Momentum
  • Impulse
  • Torque / Moment / Couple
  • Angular momentum
  • Moment of inertia
  • Reference frame
  • Energy
  • Kinetic energy
  • Potential energy
  • Mechanical work
  • Mechanical power
  • Virtual work
  • D'Alembert's principle
Core topics
  • Rigid body
  • Rigid body dynamics
  • Euler's equations (rigid body dynamics)
  • Motion
  • Linear motion
  • Newton's laws of motion
  • Newton's law of universal gravitation
  • Euler's laws of motion
  • Equations of motion
  • Inertial frame of reference
  • Non-inertial reference frame
  • Fictitious force
  • Mechanics of planar particle motion
  • Displacement (vector)
  • Relative velocity
  • Friction
  • Simple harmonic motion
  • Harmonic oscillator
  • Vibration
  • Damping
  • Damping ratio

Read more about this topic:  Gravitation (astronomy)

Other articles related to "history of gravitational theory, theory, gravitational":

Theories Of Gravitation - History of Gravitational Theory - Gravity and Quantum Mechanics
... It is possible to describe gravity in the framework of quantum field theory like the other fundamental forces, such that the attractive force of gravity arises due to ... of the order of the Planck length, where a more complete theory of quantum gravity (or a new approach to quantum mechanics) is required ...
TAMA 300
... TAMA 300 is a gravitational wave detector located at the Mitaka campus of the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan ... It is a project of the gravitational wave studies group at the Institute for Cosmic Ray Research (ICRR) of the University of Tokyo ... ray studies, and is currently developing the Large Scale Cryogenic Gravitational Wave Telescope (LCGT) ...
Bernard F. Schutz
... His research is on Einstein's theory of general relativity, more concretely on the physics of gravitational waves ... and head of the astrophysics group at the Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics in Potsdam, Germany ... the largest concerted effort to directly detect gravitational waves) ...
Canonical Units - Overview
... The Time Unit is defined by the gravitational parameter is the gravitational constant is the mass of the central reference body For canonical units, the gravitational parameter is defined as ...
History Of Gravitational Theory - Modern Era (Origin of Gravitation) - Gravity and Quantum Mechanics
... realized that it cannot be the complete theory of gravity because it is incompatible with quantum mechanics ... that it is possible to describe gravity in the framework of quantum field theory like the other fundamental forces ... It is notable that in general relativity, gravitational radiation, which under the rules of quantum mechanics must be composed of gravitons, is created only in situations ...

Famous quotes containing the words history of, theory and/or history:

    Literary works cannot be taken over like factories, or literary forms of expression like industrial methods. Realist writing, of which history offers many widely varying examples, is likewise conditioned by the question of how, when and for what class it is made use of.
    Bertolt Brecht (1898–1956)

    We have our little theory on all human and divine things. Poetry, the workings of genius itself, which, in all times, with one or another meaning, has been called Inspiration, and held to be mysterious and inscrutable, is no longer without its scientific exposition. The building of the lofty rhyme is like any other masonry or bricklaying: we have theories of its rise, height, decline and fall—which latter, it would seem, is now near, among all people.
    Thomas Carlyle (1795–1881)

    The history is always the same the product is always different and the history interests more than the product. More, that is, more. Yes. But if the product was not different the history which is the same would not be more interesting.
    Gertrude Stein (1874–1946)