Grace Hopper

Grace Hopper

Rear Admiral Grace Murray Hopper (December 9, 1906 – January 1, 1992) was an American computer scientist and United States Navy officer. A pioneer in the field, she was one of the first programmers of the Harvard Mark I computer, and developed the first compiler for a computer programming language. She conceptualized the idea of machine-independent programming languages, which led to the development of COBOL, one of the first modern programming languages. She is credited with popularizing the term "debugging" for fixing computer glitches (motivated by an actual moth removed from the computer). Owing to the breadth of her accomplishments and her naval rank, she is sometimes referred to as "Amazing Grace." The U.S. Navy destroyer USS Hopper (DDG-70) is named for her, as was the Cray XE6 "Hopper" supercomputer at NERSC.

Read more about Grace Hopper:  Early Life and Education, World War II Naval Service, UNIVAC, COBOL, Standards, Retirement, Honors, Anecdotes, Obituary Notices

Other articles related to "grace hopper":

Timeline Of Programming Languages - 1950s
... EDSAC 1951 Sort Merge Generator Betty Holberton * 1952 A-0 Grace Hopper C-10 and Short Code 1952 Autocode Alick Glennie after Alan Turing CPC Coding scheme 1952 Editing ... Backus at IBM Speedcoding 1954 ARITH-MATIC Team led by Grace Hopper at UNIVAC A-0 1954 MATH-MATIC Team led by Charles Katz A-0 1954 MATRIX MATH H G Kahrimanian * 1954 ... Simon * 1955 FLOW-MATIC Team led by Grace Hopper at UNIVAC A-0 1955 BACAIC M ...

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    Robert E. Sherwood (1896–1955)

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    James Thurber (1894–1961)