Golden Age of Detective Fiction

The Golden Age of Detective Fiction was an era of classic murder mystery novels produced by various authors, all following similar patterns and style.

Read more about Golden Age Of Detective Fiction:  Origins, The Golden Age, Description of The Genre, Decline and Fall, Enduring Influence

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Golden Age Of Detective Fiction - Enduring Influence
... Current writing influenced by the Golden Age style is often referred to as "cosy" mystery writing, as distinct from the "hardboiled" style popular in America ... Many support groups exist for fans of Golden Age Detective Fiction, including a Golden Age of Detective Fiction Wiki and Yahoo Group ...

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