Goans - Religion

Religion

Goans comprise of a predominantly Hindu population followed by Roman Catholic population and small Muslim community.Hinduism in Goa is divided into many different castes and sub-castes, known as Jatis. They use their village names to identify their clans, some of them use titles. Some are known by the occupation their ancestors have been practicing; Nayak, Borkar, Raikar, Prabhu, Kamat, Lotlikar, Chodankar, Naik, Bhat, Tari, Gaude are few examples. The Catholics display a strong Portuguese influence, because of the 451 years as a Portuguese colony. Portuguese names are common among the Christians. The Caste system is still followed by Goan Catholics. Very few Catholic families also share Indo-Portuguese ancestry.

The native Muslims are small in number and are popularly known as Moir (Konkani: मैर ).

Religion in Goa
Religion Percent
Hinduism 65.7%
Christianity 26.6%
Islam 6.8%
Others† 2%
Distribution of religions

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