Ghost World

Ghost World is a comic book written and illustrated by Daniel Clowes. It was originally serialized in issues #11 through #18 (June 1993 to March 1997) of Clowes's comic book series Eightball, and was first published in book form in 1997 by Fantagraphics Books. A commercial and critical success, it was very popular with teenage audiences on its initial release and developed into a cult classic. The book has been reprinted in multiple editions and was the basis for the 2001 feature film of the same name.

Ghost World follows the day-to-day lives of best friends Enid Coleslaw and Rebecca Doppelmeyer, two cynical, pseudo-intellectual, and intermittently witty teenage girls recently graduated from high school in the early 1990s. They spend their days wandering aimlessly around their unnamed American town, criticizing popular culture and the people they encounter while wondering what they will do for the rest of their days. As the comic progresses and Enid and Rebecca make the transition into adulthood, the two develop tensions and drift apart.

A darkly written comic, with intermittently sombre explorations of friendship and modern life, Ghost World has become renowned for its frank treatment of adolescence. The comic's success led to a movie adaptation of the same name, released in 2001 to critical acclaim and numerous nominations, including an Academy Award for Writing Adapted Screenplay, written by Clowes.

Read more about Ghost World:  Overview, Synopsis, History, Art Work and Illustration of Ghost World, Film Adaptation, Merchandise and Spin-off Material, Works Influenced, Collections

Famous quotes containing the words world and/or ghost:

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